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Arden's Day Blog

Arden's Day is a type I diabetes care giver blog written by author Scott Benner. Scott has been a stay-at-home dad since 2000, he is the author of the award winning parenting memoir, 'Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal'. Arden's Day is an honest and transparent look at life with diabetes - since 2007.

type I diabetes, parent of type I child, diabetes Blog, OmniPod, DexCom, insulin pump, CGM, continuous glucose monitor, Arden, Arden's Day, Scott Benner, JDRF, diabetes, juvenile diabetes, daddy blog, blog, stay at home parent, DOC, twitter, Facebook, @ardensday, 504 plan, Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal, Dexcom SHARE, 生命是短暂的,洗衣是永恒的, Shēngmìng shì duǎnzàn de, xǐyī shì yǒnghéng de

Brenda Menjivar Guardado

Scott Benner

Please listen, share and call

Brenda Menjivar Guardado is a 21 year living with type 1 diabetes. She fled El Salvador and sought asylum in the U.S. but her insulin is being mismanaged by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Fearing for her life Brenda asked to be deported. She is currently in the system, now in Laredo Texas, and no one can be sure that she is receiving proper care.

Nasal Glucagon Study in Phase 3

Scott Benner

from Medscape, Marlene Busko

SAN DIEGO — Giving one puff of a dry glucagon powder inside the nose of an adult with type 1 diabetes who was having a moderate to severe hypoglycemic episode was easy for a caregiver to do and led to recovery within 30 minutes in almost all patients in a phase 3 study.

Specifically, the treated patients recovered from hypoglycemia within a half hour in 96% of cases, and 90% of the caregivers (typically a spouse) found the product easy to use, Elizabeth R Seaquist, MD, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, reported at the recent American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2017 Scientific Sessions.

It is premature to comment on when the product will be available in the US,” he cautioned, but if the NDA is approved, “we are excited to bring this product to market as quickly as possible.

"We conclude that this 3-mg dose of nasal glucagon in a needle-free, user-friendly package provides a potential alternative to currently available injectable recombinant glucagon," she said.

"It really does look like [this investigational product] could be a good alternative to [intramuscular injectable] glucagon for treating severe hypoglycemia away from a hospital setting," she reiterated to Medscape Medical News.

Read the entire report here


Medtronic deal with Aetna ties insulin pump payment to patient results

Scott Benner

This does not feel right...

My opinion.... Medtronic has way too much power in the insulin pump space. You may also want to check out Mike Hoskin's thoughts on the subject over at Diabetes Mine. 

By Bill Berkrot Reuters

Medtronic Plc said on Monday it signed an agreement with health insurer Aetna Inc under which payment for its insulin pump systems will be tied to how well diabetes patients fare after switching from multiple daily insulin injections.

The deal is the latest example of the move toward contracts for prescription drugs and medical devices that attempt to bring down soaring healthcare costs by tying reimbursements to whether the products achieve their intended results.

The deal with Aetna will measure health outcomes for patients who transition to one of three Medtronic pumps that self-adjust to keep blood sugar levels in proper range based on patients' individual needs for insulin.

"This agreement reinforces our shift towards value-based healthcare," Hooman Hakami, president of the Medtronic diabetes group, said in a statement. "We know technology alone isn't enough and ultimately improved outcomes are what matter."

Patients with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 who have progressed to the need for insulin typically check blood sugar levels several times a day and inject insulin as needed. The pumps eliminate that chore.

Medtronic declined to discuss financial details of the Aetna agreement, but said such deals tie revenue to achievement of clinical improvement targets, as well as shared savings for delivering on or exceeding clinical outcomes and cost targets.

Suzanne Winter, vice president of the Medtronic diabetes group in the Americas, said the Aetna agreement will initially focus on whether patients on its pumps achieve their A1c targets, a commonly used measure of blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends A1c levels below 7.

In the future it may look at other measures, such as hypoglycemia episodes, time in proper glycemic range, and patient satisfaction, Winter said.

Medtronic already has an agreement with UnitedHealth Group Inc that is moving toward including patient outcomes and other metrics, such as total cost of care, and the company is discussing similar deals with other insurers, Winter said.

Pharmaceutical companies are also beginning to embrace reimbursement options that take patient outcomes into consideration.

U.S. biotech Amgen Inc, in an effort to improve patient access to its expensive new cholesterol drug Repatha, has offered contract options that include refunding the cost of the drug if patients suffer a heart attack or stroke while on the medicine intended to prevent them.

(Reporting by Bill Berkrot; Editing by David Gregorio)

Dexcom Announces FDA Approval of G5 Mobile App for Android Devices

Scott Benner

FINALLY!!!!!!

Rejoice Android users..... rejoice!

from Dexcom.com

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- DexCom, Inc. (Nasdaq: DXCM) the leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes, is pleased to announce the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the Dexcom G5 mobile app for Android devices. Beginning in June, Android users will have access to the free app for the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM System, allowing people with diabetes to view and monitor their glucose levels on their mobile devices to manage their diabetes in real time. The Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM System is the first and only CGM platform available for Android in the United States, complementing the 2015 iOS launch.

Download for free at the Google Play store here: bit.ly/AndroidDexcomG5MobileApp

The Dexcom G5 Mobile is a compact CGM system that works to display real-time glucose activity on certain approved display devices. The launch of Dexcom G5 Mobile for Android allows people to manage their diabetes in a more personal and discrete way by providing glucose data on their Android mobile device, as well as the ability to share it safely and conveniently. This empowers them to make informed and timely decisions about their diabetes, resulting in better health outcomes.

"Providing Android users with access to the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM System has been a priority for Dexcom," said Kevin Sayer, President and CEO, Dexcom. "The new Android app has been thoughtfully designed with customer needs and feedback in mind. It focuses on delivering technology that empowers users by putting critical glucose information on their phones and is compatible with the most popular Android devices currently in the market."

Once commercially available, the new app will make the Dexcom G5 Mobile available on millions of additional phones in the United States. The Dexcom G5 Mobile app for Android will initially be available on several Android devices from Samsung, Motorola and LG, as well as Android Wear watches.

A current list of compatible devices can be found at www.dexcom.com/compatibility.