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Arden's Day Blog

Arden's Day is a type I diabetes care giver blog written by author Scott Benner. Scott has been a stay-at-home dad since 2000, he is the author of the award winning parenting memoir, 'Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal'. Arden's Day is an honest and transparent look at life with diabetes - since 2007.

type I diabetes, parent of type I child, diabetes Blog, OmniPod, DexCom, insulin pump, CGM, continuous glucose monitor, Arden, Arden's Day, Scott Benner, JDRF, diabetes, juvenile diabetes, daddy blog, blog, stay at home parent, DOC, twitter, Facebook, @ardensday, 504 plan, Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal, Dexcom SHARE, 生命是短暂的,洗衣是永恒的, Shēngmìng shì duǎnzàn de, xǐyī shì yǒnghéng de

Filtering by Tag: technology

On This day, January 11 1922: Insulin Was First Used to Treat Diabetes

Scott Benner

On Jan. 11, 1922 fourteen-year-old Leonard Thompson was injected with a pancreatic extract prepared by Dr. Frederick Banting, and medical student, Charles Best.

from TheStar.com:

Although his blood sugars went down a little, there was not a lot of change following Thompson’s initial injection, according to the University of Toronto’s heritage website.

But biochemist Bert Collip, who had been working with Banting and Best in a lab provided by the university’s head physiologist, Prof. J.J.R.. Macleod, developed a method to refine the extract and daily injections of this extract started Jan. 23. Improvement was immediate and remarkable. The boy’s blood sugar levels dropped to normal levels (Thompson would live another 13 years with daily injections of insulin, before dying of tuberculosis.)

It was not a cure but it was a monumental breakthrough in treatment for what had been an untreatable disease.

In March, 1922 a paper describing the case of Leonard Thompson, and six other patients the Banting and Best team treated with the refined extract, was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. It was the first official announcement of an extract developed to alleviate the symptoms of diabetes.

A message of hope to sufferers from diabetes goes out authentically today from the medical research laboratories of the University of Toronto. The modesty of medical men and scientific investigators of the genuine brand attempts to minimize the results obtained. The harm of exaggeration and the injustice to both parents and research men in awakening false and premature hopes before the extracts can possibly be manufactured cannot be over-emphasized. But the fact remains that one of the most important discoveries in modern medical research has been made at the university here. It is not a cure for diabetes, its authors state. Within six months, however, their discovery will be used on a large scale, they hope, to prolong life quite considerably at least. There will be no secrecy, as from the beginning. The medical profession will know all the facts.
— The Toronto Daily Star - March 22, 1922 Edition

The Toronto Daily Star broke the news a day before other outlets. The March 22, 1922 bold all-capital headline ran eight columns on the front page: “Toronto doctors on track of diabetes cure.” A subhead stated: “Discovery made at University of Toronto will be means of prolonging life considerably — F.G. Banting and C.H. Best pushed experiments all last summer.”

The Star referred to the Alliston-born Banting — who had won the Military Cross in 1916 for bravery in World War I — as being “strangely slow in speech” and “unassuming” but he also had “the reputation of coming across with the punch at the critical moment.”

click to enlarge

Two months later, on May 22, 1922, Prof. Macleod delivered a paper on the U of T team’s findings to the American Association of Medical Physicists in Washington, D.C. and got a standing ovation. Macleod used the term “insulin” to describe the extract. According to the Canadian Encyclopedia, “in the eyes of most of the world,” this was considered the announcement of insulin.

The next year, on Oct. 26, 1923, the first Nobel prize awarded to Canadians was given to Banting and Macleod.

But the reaction of Banting and Macleod to the prize revealed a little of the testy relationship that had existed in the background between the two men.

According to an account on the website scienceheroes.com (similar to other published reports) Banting was furious that he was sharing the award with Macleod, not Best, and at first swore he “wouldn’t accept the award.” But friends persuaded him that it wouldn’t be smart to refuse the first Nobel for a Canadian (he remains the youngest Nobel Laureate in Physiology/Medicine). Instead, Banting announced he would split his share of the $40,000 monetary prize with Best.

read the story in it’s entirety at TheStar.com


Did Eli Lilly just get into the insulin pump game?

Scott Benner

from Drug Delivery Business

Dexcom said today that it inked a development deal with Eli Lilly to include its continuous glucose monitor in the insulin-maker’s connected delivery devices.

The pair plans to start clinical trials by the end of this year, adding that they hope to position the combination of their technologies as a comprehensive solution for people with diabetes.

“Lilly’s Connected Diabetes Ecosystem promises to drive a significant step forward in diabetes management. As technology converges in our industry, we believe that connected systems will become the standard of care over time,” Kevin Sayer, Dexcom president & CEO said in prepared remarks.

“By combining devices, drugs and technology, we can deliver solutions that adapt to each person’s unique needs in managing their diabetes while also providing compelling advancements for both physicians and payers.”

“The Connected Diabetes Ecosystem relies not only on Lilly’s core diabetes expertise, but also the strength of our key partners such as Dexcom,” Enrique Conterno, president of Lilly Diabetes and Lilly USA, added. “Dexcom will be an important collaborator in our mission to improve outcomes and reduce the daily burden for people with diabetes.”


Daylight Saving Time to Fall Back

Scott Benner

It's that time again and whether you are a fan of the practice of Daylight Saving Time (I thought Saving had an S at the end until today) or not, it's about to happen.

In 2017 most of our watches, clocks and appliances adjust themselves but there are still a few items in the world that aren't connected to the Internet and much of your diabetes technology falls into that category. 

Don't forget to adjust the time on your meter, continuous glucose monitor and insulin pump this weekend.

The person that came up with daylight saving must have had a child with type 1 diabetes, because who else considers two in the morning to be a viable time to accomplish something? 

Daylight saving officially ends this year at 2 a.m. on November 5th but you can adjust your D-tech anytime before you go to bed. Be cautious, some insulin pumps will suspend bolus calculation assistance for a period of time after your adjust it's clock - plan accordingly.

If you want to learn more about Daylight Saving there is a quick video and detailed blog post over on National Geographic that you may enjoy.


Dexcom Opens their API to Third-party Developers

Scott Benner

Dexcom leads the way in diabetes yet again...

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- DexCom, Inc. (Nasdaq: DXCM), the leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), announced today the availability of a public API, empowering third-party developers to connect patient-authorized CGM data into a broad range of software applications. This pioneering approach to CGM data sharing is intended to enable a rich ecosystem of novel solutions and put the user in control of where and how they interact with their glucose data.

"In launching this developer platform, Dexcom combines our CGM data expertise with the creativity of the developer ecosystem to enable new solutions and business models in the treatment and management of diabetes," said Annika Jimenez, Senior Vice President of Data, Dexcom. "Dexcom believes in data mobility and customer choice. It also believes that the API opens up opportunities to drive Dexcom CGM data into the heart of new digital solutions for payers, providers, and most importantly people with diabetes."

Get to it diabetes app developers, go make something great!

Dexcom Dev Page


New Apple Ad features Dexcom: Here is why that is important to you

Scott Benner

"my daughter was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes"

People living with T1D are understandably excited to hear the words, "my daughter was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes" in an Apple ad... but that is just the beginning of why this Apple Watch advertisement should get your heart pumping.

The percentage of people with type 1 using continuous glucose monitoring technology is still relatively low. The barriers to adoption are multivariable. Cost, lack of insurance coverage, misunderstanding of what the technology brings to your life and plain just not knowing that it exists are but a few. The truth however is that even if you never find your way to a CGM this quick video, in my opinion, should still make you happy. Here's why.

We finally have a device manufacturer in the diabetes world who moved beyond the diabetes world. When Dexcom searched for others whose collaboration might improve their product, they didn't just form a relationship with a little start-up. They formed a relationship with Apple. The mention of Apple Watch integration with Dexcom in this ad, in my opinion, is not random. The mention didn't happen just because someone wrote a letter. It is there on purpose. This is Apple telling us what is important to them and a signal of where they are focusing their efforts when it comes to the health space. 

The company that put a smartphone into most every hand on the plant and the company that is hugely responsible for the technology that keeps my daughter healthy, they are dating. I think we are all going to like what their future children grow up to be. I'm even more excited when I think about the relationship that Dexcom has with Omnipod and the ways that the Apple connection could improve all aspects of the tech that helps to keep Arden's BGs where we want them. 

For the moment its great to hear diabetes in the mainstream in such a positive way, but I think that this is only the beginning of how Dexcom and Apple are going to make us smile. It is important to note that Dexcom advertises on the Juicebox Podcast but that I wrote this piece on my own.