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Arden's Day Blog

Arden's Day is a type I diabetes care giver blog written by author Scott Benner. Scott has been a stay-at-home dad since 2000, he is the author of the award winning parenting memoir, 'Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal'. Arden's Day is an honest and transparent look at life with diabetes - since 2007.

type I diabetes, parent of type I child, diabetes Blog, OmniPod, DexCom, insulin pump, CGM, continuous glucose monitor, Arden, Arden's Day, Scott Benner, JDRF, diabetes, juvenile diabetes, daddy blog, blog, stay at home parent, DOC, twitter, Facebook, @ardensday, 504 plan, Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal, Dexcom SHARE, 生命是短暂的,洗衣是永恒的, Shēngmìng shì duǎnzàn de, xǐyī shì yǒnghéng de

Five Months Later - A1 Cya later

Scott Benner

Just a quick update to let you all know that Arden’s A1c level has fallen from 8.5 to 8 since see started using an insulin pump!  An 8 indicates that Arden’s average BG is about 205 which is a bit high but still in range for her age group.  Hopefully as we begin to understand some of the pump’s more intricate functions we can bring her number down even more.  The OmniPod should definitely be credited with this successes.

 

More info about A1c - Hemoglobin A, a protein found inside red blood cells, carries oxygen throughout the body. When there is glucose in the bloodstream, it can actually stick (glycate) to the hemoglobin A protein. More glucose in the blood means that more glucose sticks to hemoglobin, and a higher percent of hemoglobin proteins become glycated.

Once glucose sticks to a hemoglobin protein, it typically remains for the lifespan of the hemoglobin A protein — as long as 120 days. Therefore, at any moment, the glucose attached to the hemoglobin A protein reflects the level of the blood sugar over the last two to three months.

The A1c test measures how much glucose is actually stuck to hemoglobin A, or more specifically, what percent of hemoglobin proteins are glycated. Thus, having a 7% A1c means that 7% of the hemoglobin proteins are glycated.