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Arden's Day Blog

Arden's Day is a type I diabetes care giver blog written by author Scott Benner. Scott has been a stay-at-home dad since 2000, he is the author of the award winning parenting memoir, 'Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal'. Arden's Day is an honest and transparent look at life with diabetes - since 2007.

type I diabetes, parent of type I child, diabetes Blog, OmniPod, DexCom, insulin pump, CGM, continuous glucose monitor, Arden, Arden's Day, Scott Benner, JDRF, diabetes, juvenile diabetes, daddy blog, blog, stay at home parent, DOC, twitter, Facebook, @ardensday, 504 plan, Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal, Dexcom SHARE, 生命是短暂的,洗衣是永恒的, Shēngmìng shì duǎnzàn de, xǐyī shì yǒnghéng de

Possible Cure Announced

Scott Benner

JDRF Funded Research Shows Promise for Prevention, Reversal of Type 1 Diabetes

New York, NY, November 18, 2008 -- Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco have reported that two common cancer drugs have been used to block and reverse type 1 diabetes in mice. The JDRF-funded study, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by Jeffrey Bluestone, Ph.D., director of the Diabetes Center at UCSF and an expert in the field of autoimmunity.

"The findings suggest that kinase inhibitors -- successfully used in cancer -- may provide an important new therapeutic approach for treatment of new onset type 1 diabetes and potentially other autoimmune disorders," said JDRF Director of Immunology Teodora Staeva, Ph.D.

The drugs -- Imatinib and Sunitnib, sold as Gleevec and Sutent, respectively -- are used to treat cancer by blocking tyrosine kinases, an enzyme that modify cells' signaling proteins through a simple biochemical change.  Kinases trigger cell growth, and it is widely believed that tyrosine kinases are a contributing factor to autoimmune diseases and cancer.  The researchers hypothesized that tyrosine kinases may also serve as a trigger to the body's attack on the immune system.

The researchers at the University of California, San Francisco treated non-diabetic mice prone to developing diabetes with imatinib or sunitinib, and found that the drugs prevented the onset of diabetes past the seven-week treatment.  Mice that already developed diabetes were treated with the drugs and results concluded that after two months of treatment, 80 percent no longer had diabetes.

The science was conducted as part of the Immune Tolerance Network, partially funded by JDRF.